Students use dynamic tools to solve problems involving fractions. Problems include comparison of the relative size of two fractions, the ordering of fractions from smallest to biggest and adding fractions.

Teacher notes

  • Students first predict the answer to a problem involving fractions. They use a dynamic tool to solve the problem then see their problem-solving displayed in different formats.
  • Visual, sound and textual feedback is provided, and guided support is provided to students experiencing difficulty. Students see the results of their problem solving in different formats including an area model, the fraction's position on a number line and the symbolic fraction.
  • A notebook, which can be printed on completion of the task, automatically records the problems solved.
  • Randomisation of the activities supports repeated use.

Learning objects

Fraction fiddle picture.

Fraction fiddle: matching cake fractions
Fran is filling orders for cakes, not everyone wants a whole cake so she needs to match the cake orders to the cakes. Students use a circular region representation tool to find the matching symbolic fraction.

Fraction fiddle picture.

Fraction fiddle: comparing unit fractions
The hungry kiwis each ate a fraction of a worm. Students predict who ate more or who ate less. Using the fraction-making tool, students make the fractions and watch the parts of the worm appear and observe the fractions on the number line to see which one is bigger. The fractions presented are unit fractions such as Ω and ?.

Fraction fiddle picture.

Fraction fiddle: comparing non-unit fractions
The greedy birds each ate a fraction of a worm. Students predict who ate more or who ate less. They then make the fractions and watch the parts of the worm appear and observe the fractions on the number line to see which one is bigger. The fractions presented are non-unit fractions such as æ and ?.

Fraction fiddle picture.

Fraction fiddle: hit the apple
To help an archer hit an apple target, students use a number line tool to find two fractions that will add together to make one whole. With a given denominator (1 or both) students manipulate relative size of the two fractions to make total of one whole. Reach a target of 1. Students can repeat the problem to find different solutions.

Fraction fiddle picture.

Fraction fiddle: tool
Students use an open-ended interactive tool that allows them to create a fraction (up to 3). They then view the symbolic notation dynamically represented both as building blocks and on a number line. Students can build and compare two fractions.

Fraction fiddle picture.

Fraction fiddle: shoot the hoop
Students use a number line tool to find two fractions that will add together to make one whole to help shoot a ball into the hoop. With a given numerator (or 1 num and 1 denom given) students manipulate relative size of fractions to make total of one whole. Reach a target of 1. Students can repeat the problem to find different solutions.

Fraction fiddle picture.

Fraction fiddle: reach the target
Students use a number line tool to find two fractions that will add together to make the target number to make the plane hit the target. With a given denominator (no given numbers) students manipulate relative size of fractions to make given total. Reach a given target less than 2 (not 1). Students can repeat the problem to find different solutions.