Te Kaupae Ako
He Tauira Whakawhitiwhiti Kōrero
He taonga ōrite (Objects the same)
As the children play with objects in the learning environment ask them to find objects that are like a given object. This will draw their attention to the different features of objects.
 
Can you find an object like Sam's one?
Kimihia tētahi taonga he ōrite ki tā Hāmi.
 
Can you see two objects the same? 
E kite ana koe i ētahi taonga ōrite e rua?
 
Have you got an object like this one?
Kei a koe tētahi taonga he ōrite ki tēnei te āhua?
 
Please get me one that looks like this.
Tīkina atu tētahi taonga he ōrite ki tēnei te āhua.
 
Can you find me another one like that?
Kimihia tētahi anō taonga kia ōrite ki tēnei te āhua.
 
Encourage children to describe the features that are the same:
Why is it like Sam's?
He aha i ōrite ai ki tā Hēmi?
 
Why are they the same?
He aha i ōrite ai ēnei taonga e rua?
 
What makes it similar?
He aha ngā āhuatanga ōrite o ēnei taonga e rua?
 
Which parts are the same?
He aha ngā wāhanga e ōrite ana?
 
Watch for:
Do children identify objects that are similar by focusing on features that are shared? Can they describe these similarities? What features do they focus on and can they use a range of features to find objects that are alike?
He taonga ōrite, he taonga rerekē
(Objects the same and different)
As opportunities arise, ask children to sort objects they are playing with on the basis of their similarities and differences. This will develop their understanding that objects can be grouped on the basis of their similarities.
 
Can you make a pile of objects/shapes that are alike? How are they the same?
Whakaputungia ngā taonga/āhua ōrite ki konei. He aha ngā āhuatanga ōrite?
Hoatu ngā taonga/āhua ōrite ki korā. He aha i ōrite ai?
 
Can you sort these objects into groups?   How shall we sort them?
Whakarōpūngia ēnei taonga. Me pēhea te whakarōpū?
 
Which pile/group should I put this object/shape in? 
Ki tēhea rōpū hoatu ai i tēnei taonga/āhua?
 
Where does this object belong? How do you know?
Ko tēhea te rōpū e tika ana mō tēnei taonga/āhua? He aha ai?
 
Follow the sorting with questions that encourage children to describe their thinking with a focus on the features of the objects/shapes:
How is this object/shape the same as the ones in this pile?
He aha ngā āhuatanga ōrite o tēnei taonga ki ō ngā taonga o tēnei rōpū?
He aha i ōrite ai tēnei taonga me ērā o te rōpū nei?
 
How is this object/shape different to those ones? 
He aha ngā āhuatanga rerekē o tēnei taonga ki ō ngā taonga o tēnei rōpū?
He aha i rerekē ai tēnei taonga me ērā o te rōpū nei?
 
What is the same about the objects/shapes in this pile?
He aha ngā āhuatanga ōrite o ngā taonga o tēnei rōpū?
 
Why did you put these objects/shapes together?
He aha i whakanōhia ai ēnei taonga ki te rōpū kotahi?
 
Why don’t these objects/shapes belong with these ones?
He aha i kore ai ēnei taonga i whakanōhia ki tēnā rōpū?
He aha i kore ai i tika tēnā taonga ki te taha o ērā?
 
Why does this object/shape belong in that group?
He aha i tika ai tēnei taonga mō tēnā o ngā rōpū?
 
Watch for:
By listening to the kinds of attributes that the children use in their sorting, you will be able to tell which features they know and use and how they think about shapes. 
Te whakarōpū taonga
(Classifying objects)
As opportunities present themselves encourage children to group objects they are playing with by their geometric features.
 
I see your shape has 3 sides and is flat. It's called a triangle. Can you find another one like it?
E toru ngā tapa o tō āhua, he papatahi hoki. Ka kīia he tapatoru tēnā āhua. Kimihia tētahi anō tapatoru e ōrite ana.
 
What is your tin like? Yes, it is is round and long, isn't it. Can you find any other objects like that?
Pēhea nei te āhua o tēnā kēne? Āe rā, he porowhita a runga, a raro, he roa tōna tinana. Kimihia tētahi atu taonga he pēnā anō te āhua.
 
How many corners does that square have? Can you find any other shapes that have 4 corners?
E hia ngā kokonga o tēnā āhua? E kite ana koe i tētahi atu āhua e whā ōna kokonga?
 
This cube has 6 sides. Can you find another one like this?
E ono ngā mata o tēnei āhua. Ka kīia he mataono tōna ingoa. Kimihia tētahi atu āhua e ōrite ana.
 
Encourage children to identify the shared features of the groups they have made:
Tell me about these objects.
Kōrero mai mō ēnei āhua/taonga.
He aha ngā kōrero hei whakamārama i te āhua o ēnei taonga?
 
What are these circles like?
He ōrite ēnei porowhita ki te aha?
 
How are these objects alike?
He aha i ōrite ai ēnei taonga/āhua?
 
What’s the same about all these ones?
He aha ngā āhuatanga ōrite o ēnei āhua/taonga?
 
Watch for:
What groups of 2-dimensional shapes and 3-dimensional obejcts are familiar to children? Can they describe the features of these groups?